Never Hear Wolf

Being a veterinarian here in Vermont is pretty awesome all of the time. There are two seasons that are especially awesome to be a vet here; Winter and Summer. Both seasons bring in tourists and both seasons are a little bit slower for our regular clientele so we can focus on catering to our out of state clients without feeling like we are ignoring our regular folk. It’s a really fun situation. Also, I like skiing and swimming. Not at the same time of course.

I am using three out of stater stories to illustrate the importance of taking to heart the complaint a client calls in with.

1. It was the first July I was in practice. It was hot and my wife and I had only recently found out we were expecting our first child (we didn’t know it was a girl until she was born.) My in-laws were visiting and we were living in East Dorset at the time. There was a great little pick your own berry farm just down the road from us. The afternoon plan was, we were going to pick some berries then head down to Emerald Lake State Park for a quick swim before grilling some dinner on the deck. It was going to be a pretty sweet New England summer afternoon and night.

But I was on call and of course my phone rang as we were headed into the berry farm. I took down the client’s information and called while I was finding a parking spot. It was legal to use a hand held device while driving at this point. I might be the reason it’s not anymore. The client was visiting from Connecticut and their Labrador Retriever puppy had been spayed the day before. There was a problem with the incision. I called and the woman owner – a pleasant but slightly frantic pet owner – answered. She informed me that her dogs spay incision was open and she was pretty sure that she could see intestines.

I was fresh out of school, young and at least as excited about veterinary medicine as I am today. I told her I would meet her at the hospital right away. I told my wife what was happening and she – infected by my enthusiasm – agreed to walk the mile back to our house. In the heat. Pregnant. I left in a hurry and made the drive from East Dorset to Rutland in 19 minutes. Google map that. This story will be here when you get back. I have a client who is on a police force in Southern Vermont and lives in one of the towns I drove through way too fast. I am sorry. I am glad no one got hurt.

I pulled into the driveway and was kind of excited that I beat the client there. I got out of the car, grabbed my keys and went to unlock the door. Then I caught a glimpse of myself in the reflection in the window. I had on board shorts, an athletic shirt and flip flops. (Relax OSHA I have Crocs in the clinic (relax fashion police I’m a veterinarian I’m supposed to look terrible)) I wondered how anyone was going to take me seriously. I threw on a pair of scrubs and my Crocs.

The client arrived and I led them into the exam room. I carefully asked the dog to lay down and had a look at her incision. I’m not sure what I was expecting but I did my best to hold in a laugh, told the woman that the incision edges were just a little swollen and there was a small strand of subcutaneous fat that was poking through the edge of the incision. To ameliorate her concerns, I applied a bandage and told her she could remove the bandage in 24 hours and could apply an antibiotic ointment twice daily until the incision was healed.

2. The second incision emergency was in a Labrador Retriever visiting the Ludlow area from New Jersey one Winter. The owner carried her in as I was finishing appointments one evening. I remember it being already dark so here in Vermont it might have been just a little past noon on a Winter day. The dog had been spayed a few days previously and her owner was adamant that the incision had opened up while they were out snowshoeing that morning. A brief six mile snowshoe adventure in some fairly deep and fresh snow. He also mentioned that he was taking the dog cross country skiing tomorrow and that the dog’s intestines were poking through. In the same sentence. Both of those statements can not be true.

I took a look and he was half way correct, the incision was open a small amount at the very top of the incision. The intestines? No that turned out to just be an extra long suture tag from the closure. I trimmed the suture back a bit and encouraged the owner to apply a small amount of antibiotic ointment to the open part of the incision until it healed. And to try to tone down the exercise for a week or so.

3. Ah the rule of three. Also known as the comic triple. The third call came in the Winter as well. A young couple from Massachusetts had brought their recently spayed Labrador Retriever – a recurring theme in incision issues all around – with them on a ski vacation. One of their friends had come along with them and was watching the dog while they were enjoying a sunny and warm ski day. We got the call on a very busy Saturday morning. Labrador. Visiting from out of state. Spay incision is open. Something was sticking out. I told the receptionist to have them come right in. I remember turning and looking right at the two technicians we had working that morning and making a joke about it needing a good application of antibiotic ointment. I remember having a brief conversation about telling them to wait until they got home to their vet in Massachusetts because we were so busy. We decided to play it safe and that it would be quick and easy. I would probably just step out in the lobby, look, tell them it would be fine and would send them on their way.

All of our smiles and laughter disappeared when a trembling, nervous black lab was led into our treatment area. I could tell from where I was standing that something was wrong. Yes, I’m pretty good at recognizing problems but also she had something that should have been in her abdomen trailing behind her on the floor. So it wasn’t too hard. I could not tell if the dangling bit of innards contained intestines but it was large and starting to smell a little putrid so at that point, anything was possible. I was pretty worried about this little puppy. On top of that she was justifiably upset and nervous. We couldn’t get her to hold still for much more than a physical exam and even then getting a temperature was an exercise in futility. I desperately wanted to sedate this dog and determine how bad the issue was and what needed to be done as soon as possible. But the owners were still skiing and not answering their phones. Megan, one of our technicians sat with the puppy and tried to keep her calm until we got in touch with the owners. I carried on with appointments, putting the distressed little puppy out of my mind as much as I could while I examined other pets and addressed other concerns. Finally about an hour after the initial phone call, the owners called and gave me permission to sedate their dog. They were coming right down from Killington which is about a half hour drive from our practice on River Street in Rutland.

We sedated the dog and examined the incision and the abdominal contents coming out of the incision. A small amount of the omentum which is a lacy blanket of fat that covers and protects the abdominal organs was hanging from a very small hole in the abdominal incision. Fortunately, there were no intestines and just a few blood vessels associated with the omentum protruding from a two inch long section of open incision. By the time the owners showed up, I had the problem figured out and a solution worked up. We went over the plan, the costs and the expected recovery. We agreed on everything and we took the dog into surgery immediately.

The technician working with me in surgery, Alex, would feel like I was leaving a little bit out if I didn’t inform you that the surgery was not straightforward. During the removal of all of the omentum that had been outside the body a large artery was inadvertently transected with the needle attached to our suture material. The resulting bleeding was fairly remarkable and it took some time to get the bleeding stopped, clean away all the blood and be certain that the bleeding was not going to come back. We had allotted an hour for surgery and all in the procedure took us a little over two hours.

We had a few appointments we had to reschedule due to taking the surgery into overtime. So on top of a stressful and exhausting surgery, I had to make a bunch of apologetic phone calls while waiting for the lab to recover from anesthesia. The puppy recovered and we ended up sending her home later that evening. The puppy went on to make a full recovery.

I’m glad I had the puppy come right in. I’m glad I didn’t give in to the pressure of a busy day and the past experience of false alarms. Asking them to wait until Monday would have been a disaster. Hopefully they wouldn’t have followed that recommendation but more importantly, I’m glad I didn’t make it.

I hope that life will continue to throw enough of these experiences at me so I don’t get complacent or comfortable enough to start taking my clients concerns less seriously than they do. At least not until I confirm that the exposed intestines are actually just suture material.

Thanks for reading.

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One thought on “Never Hear Wolf

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